Māori Research Funding 2016

Māori health research is research that values Māori worldviews and builds Māori research capacity and leadership. It's research that contributes to Mātauranga. Brain Research New Zealand - Rangahau Roro Aotearoa strives to build up an evidence base which contributes to Māori health outcomes, derived from high-quality Māori health research that upholds rangatiratanga and uses and advances Māori knowledge, resources and people.

Māori PhD Scholarship applications are now open

Brain Research New Zealand is delighted to announce a call for Māori PhD Scholarship applications.

We are offering a fully funded PhD scholarship to be taken up during 2017 for a Māori research student. This scholarship is for an innovative neuroscience research project that relates to the ageing brain, based at any one of the following institutions (the Universities of Otago, Canterbury, Auckland, or AUT). This prestigious scholarship includes funding for tuition fees plus 3 years stipend at $28,000 per year tax-free, plus $6,000 in working expenses.

Please pass this notice on to anyone that you think might be interested in applying or who may know of someone interested in applying.

The deadline for submissions directly to BRNZ dean.alexander@otago.ac.nz) is 5pm 25 November 2016.

If you have a student who would like additional information or support throughout the application process, please contact BRNZ-RRA’s Māori Strategic leader Dr Hinemoa Elder at hinemoa@extra.co.nz. Dr Elder can provide valuable advice as to how applicants might build relationships with existing Māori researchers within BRNZ-RRA and various Māori research entities.

BRNZ Maori PhD scholarship 2016 advert

(2.4 MB, PDF)

BRNZ Maori PhD scholarship Application Form

(1.5 MB, MSWORD)

Dr Hinemoa Elder - Māori Strategy Leader (Kaiwhakahaere Māori)

Dr Hinemoa Elder welcomes your proposal

Dr Hinemoa Elder 

Directorate: Māori Strategy Leader (Kaiwhakahaere Māori)

MBCHB, FRANZCP, PhD 

From  Ngāti Kuri, Te Aupouri, Te Rarawa and Ngāpuhi, Dr Hinemoa Elder is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Auckland and Professorial Fellow of Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi. She currently holds an Health Research Council of NZ  Eru Pomare Post Doctoral Fellowship implementing her theoretical work in developing a Māori needs assessment tool and approaches to working with whānau experiencing traumatic brain injury. She has many years of experience in the areas of child and adolescent psychiatry, indigenous issues pertaining to mental health and rehabilitation, neuropsychiatry and youth forensic psychiatry.  She is an internationally recognised researcher and author.

Dr Elder has also served on Ministry of Health committees tackling issues of Conduct Disorder and suicide prevention. Dr Elder was a member of the expert advisory group of Blueprint II, which articulated the framework for New Zealand Mental Health service funding for the next 10 years.

She is a deputy psychiatrist member of the NZ Mental Health Review Tribunal and on the list of Specialist Assessors/Medical Consultants for assessment under the Intellectual Disability Compulsory Care and Rehabilitation Act 2003.


She is an invited Research Associate of the Person Centred Research Centre and at the National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences at AUT. She is one of the few child and adolescent psychiatrists with experience in working with whanau in the context of traumatic brain injury. This includes questioning in what ways western approaches to research and practice work for Māori and methods are needed to investigate issues that have salience for Māori people.

Contact Dr Elder

BRNZ call for Māori Summer Scholarships

Brain Research New Zealand is delighted to announce a call for Māori Summer Scholarship applications.

We are offering summer scholarships to be taken up during 2016/2017 summer period for a Māori research student based at any one of the following institutions: the Universities of Otago, Canterbury, Auckland, or AUT. Students may wish to contact one of our investigators (listed in the guidelines attached) to discuss possible research topics, or contact the relevant supervisor to apply for one of the research projects listed below.

Predefined research topics:

1.      A Māori Perspective on Hearing, Hearing Loss and Hearing-Health Services

Māori are over represented in prevalence statistics of hearing loss but underrepresented in the population that seeks hearing services. The overall aim of the project is to understand why this maybe by engaging with older Māori to understand their perceptions of hearing and hearing loss.  A summer student would be involved in developing questionnaire and interview approaches for the project and a masters student would take this further to undertake and analyse interviews and hui. 

·        Supervisor: Professor Peter Thorne (pr.thorne@auckland.ac.nz)

 

Please pass this notice on to anyone that you think might be interested in applying or who may know of someone interested in applying.

The deadline for submissions directly to BRNZ (dean.alexander@otago.ac.nz) is 5pm 31 October 2016.

 

If you have a student who would like additional information or support throughout the application process, please contact BRNZ-RRA’s Māori Strategic leader Dr Hinemoa Elder at hinemoa@extra.co.nz.

 

BRNZ Māori Research Project Funding 2016

Dr Margaret Dudley: Māori lecturer in Clinical Psychology

Dr Margaret Dudley: Māori lecturer in Clinical Psychology

BRNZ Principal Investigator and Clinical Psychologist Dr Margaret Dudley (Te Rarawa, Te Aupōuri and Ngāti Kahu) is a full time lecturer in the Doctorate of Clinical Psychology at the University of Auckland. She has been a clinical psychologist for 16 years, specialising in the area of neuropsychology.

Currently, Dr Dudley says most tests that neuropsychologists use to assess people with a neurological disorder have been developed in the USA or UK, and do not reflect a Māori worldview. “The aim of my research is to obtain a Māori knowledge base that will inform the development of a neuropsychological measure that assists in the diagnosis of dementia in Māori”.

Dr Margaret Dudley wants more Māori students training to become clinical psychologists. She believes that Māori clinicians are urgently needed in the community and are a key factor for the provision of effective care to those Māori who present with mental health issues.

Māori have a high incidence of traumatic brain injury, almost three times the rate of any other ethnic group in New Zealand. According to Health Research Council of New Zealand, Māori also experience strokes at an average age of 61 years compared to 75 years for Pākehā.

Dr Dudley believes there is a lack of Māori involvement in rehabilitation, "We need to have neurorehabilitation services that meet the cultural needs of our people who suffer neurological damage. Current services are based on western paradigms that alienate many Māori and therefore do not facilitate optimal rehabilitation for Māori,” she explains. 

Contact Dr Dudley