Māori Hapu and Iwi: A vital part of Brain Research New Zealand

22 May 2015

During the exciting launch of Brain Research New Zealand, TV1's Māori current affairs program Te Karere attended and spoke with our PIs.

 

Speakers at the launch indicated that BRNZ would undertake extensive community engagement activities and Iwi liaison throughout New Zealand to engage with and help Māori communities, as a part of the strategic plan.   

 

richard-faull

"We can't stop it, but we can do a lot." Co-Director of BRNZ, Distinguished Professor Richard Faull told Te Karere.

 

"For diseases like Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, Huntington’s Disease and  Motor Neuron Disease.

 

Some of the treatments will be science based and some will be based in the community."

b-hongi

During the exciting launch of Brain Research New Zealand, TV1's Māori current affairs program Te Karere attended and spoke with our PIs.

 

Speakers at the launch indicated that BRNZ would undertake extensive community engagement activities and Iwi liaison throughout New Zealand to engage with and helping Māori communities, as a part of the strategic plan.  

 

Environments that are family-based and marae-based offer strong support to older people. These environments are integral to preventing and treating neurodegenerative diseases of the ageing brain.

 

Māori neuroscientist at the Centre for Brain Research, Dr Melanie Cheung (Ngāti Rangitihi, Te Arawa) spoke with Te Karere at the launch: " Often we talk about kai, and keeping your brain stimulated. A lot of Māori kaumatua and older people tend to walk around the Marae and get some exercise and social interactions, which is really important."  

BRNZ_marae

BRNZ is committed to honouring and integrating traditional tikanga (ceremony/customary) and Mātauranga Māori (Māori traditional knowledge) into the treatment, intervention and prevention initiatives for Alzheimers, Parkinson's, Huntington's diseases, Stroke and all other neurodegenerative disorders of the ageing brain.

 

One of the key outcomes for the BRNZ is working with Māori communities to understand their needs and values and build equal relationships, incorporating Mātauranga into innovative research and clinical methods, and by supporting Māori to determine their own pathways to brain health through training of Māori neuroscientists and clinicians.

 

The first stage in that process will be the appointment of a Māori Strategy Manager. Stay tuned for more details about that person. 

 

 

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